Dick Van Dyke, car accident for the 97-year-old actor

Lost control of the wheel of his car on the wet streets of Malibu, California and crashed into a gate: injured

Road accident for a Hollywood legend: Dick Van Dyke, 97, lost control of the wheel of his Lexus car on the wet streets of Malibu, California, recently flooded by rain, and crashed into a gate. The news is reported by the site “Tmz”.

Bruised and bloodied, the American actor – famous for starring in the Disney film “Mary Poppins” (1964) as Bert, the cheerful singing chimney sweep – reportedly suffered only “minor injuries”, police said. He was treated on the spot by emergency medical doctors and then brought home by a friend. Police were reported to have filed papers with the Department of Motor Vehicles for him to retake his driving test, due to his nearly 100-year-old status.

Van Dyke’s Hollywood career spans over seven decades in film, television and stage. His accolades include Golden Globes, Tonys and Grammys. Although the pinnacle of his career was reached in the sixties, when he starred in films such as Norman Jewison’s “The Art of Loving”, Byron Paul’s “Commander Robin Crusoe” and Ken Hughes’ “Citty Chitty Bang Bang” and was featured on the hit TV series ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show’, last month Van Dyke once again hit television screens as the oldest contestant ever to perform on Fox’s ‘The Masked Singer’ singing contest ” (The Masked Singer).

It’s not the first time the actor has found himself in danger. In 2013 he was rescued from a burning car on the California highway: also on that occasion he was not seriously injured. He later humorously tweeted a photo of the burnt-out car with the caption: “Used Jaguar for sale at rock bottom prices!”

In a 2010 interview with Craig Ferguson, the then 84-year-old actor recalled an incident where he drifted after falling asleep on his surfboard. In an incident that could have been a scene from “Mary Poppins”: he said that a group of friendly dolphins had helped him push his board towards the shore.



Source-www.adnkronos.com