Sustainable development, palm oil between nutrition and production

These are the themes at the center of the webinar organized by the Italian Union for Sustainable Palm Oil, as part of the Sustainable Development Festival promoted by Asvis, entitled ‘Sustainable nutrition and zero deforestation goal’

Palm oil between nutrition and sustainable production. These are the themes at the center of the webinar organized by the Italian Union for Sustainable Palm Oil, as part of the Sustainable Development Festival promoted by Asvis, entitled ‘Sustainable nutrition and zero deforestation‘.



For Mauro Fontanapresident of the Italian Union for Sustainable Palm Oil, “the epochal challenge that the world is trying to face, albeit with great delay, is to simultaneously solve two issues that require conflicting interventions: food security and food safetyto address demographic growth and undernutrition with the need for greater food production and the use of additional land with greater productivity, and sustainability declined in its three forms, economic, social and environmental, and the contrast to the effects of climate change that require interventions of the opposite direction “. Hence the need to find a balance between these two needs through a concept of ‘sustainable nutrition‘. And “Sustainable palm oil, thanks to its productivity while respecting sustainability, can represent one of the many levers useful for its realization”, observes Fontana.

Maria Vincenza Chiriacò And Matteo Bellotta of the Euro-Mediterranean Center for Cymatic Changes – Cmcc Foundation have introduced the results of a study on the socio-economic impacts of palm oil production. “We conducted a review on 82 publications from 2010 to 2020 – explains Bellotta – trying to see how these publications judged the impact of palm oil production on 8 indicators with a strong socio-economic character”, from poverty to hunger, up to gender equality, etc …. All with “a focus on sustainability schemes and their application”. In summary, the analysis shows that “there is support for the economy, a decrease in poverty rates, which improves access to food; there are critical issues related above all to access to land, therefore to a lower reduction in inequalities relating to communities and gender, and to working conditions, however, sustainability schemes are seen as a possible solution to these critical issues “.

Furthermore, announces Chiriacò, “we are completing further work that re-examines the environmental impact, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions but also of potential land use changes, of possible substitutes for palm oil”.

Speaking of “diet diversity”, Sebastiano Banni, University of Cagliari, notes that this “is favorable to sustainability and the environment”. In particular the flexitarian diet “is the one that is most environmentally sustainable“.

Furthermore, this diet (“which does not exclude any type of food or nutrient”) “is much more easily customizable taking into account the needs of the individual through parameters that can be evaluated”. Banni also remembers ithe “nutritional role of palmitic acid, much demonized”, while it is “among the most common fatty acids in our body”. Furthermore “it is present in all foods and it is impossible to make a diet without palmitic acid which, among other things, has many physiological properties and therefore plays a fundamental role; for this reason in our body it does not come only from the diet but we can produce it at starting with glucose, “he explains.



Source-www.adnkronos.com